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Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, RanakpurIncredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, RanakpurIncredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, RanakpurIncredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, RanakpurIncredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur
Incredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, RanakpurIncredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, RanakpurIncredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, RanakpurIncredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, RanakpurIncredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, RanakpurIncredible !ndia : Rajasthan - Jain Temples, Ranakpur

The renowned Jain temple at Ranakpur is dedicated to Adinatha. There is also a small Sun temple which is managed by the Udaipur royal family trust.

Architecture

Light colored marble has been used for the construction of this grand temple which occupies an area of approximately 60 x 62 meters. The temple, with its distinctive domes, shikhara, turrets and cupolas rises majestically from the slope of a hill. Over 1444 marble pillars, carved in exquisite detail, support the temple. The pillars are all differently carved and no two pillars are the same. It is also said that it is impossible to count the pillars. Also all the statues face one or the other statue. There is one beautiful carving made out of a single marble rock where there 108 heads of snakes and numerous tails. One cannot find the end of the tails. The image faces all four cardinal directions. In the axis of the main entrance, on the western side, is the largest image.

The temple is designed as chaumukha—with four faces. The construction of the temple and quadrupled image symbolize the Tirthankara’s conquest of the four cardinal directions and hence the cosmos.

The construction is well documented in a 1437 CE copper-plate record, inscriptions in the temple and a Sanskrit text Soma-Saubhagya Kavya.[4] Inspired by a dream of a celestial vehicle, Dhanna Shah, a Porwad, commenced its construction, under the patronage of Rana Kumbha, then ruler of Mewar. The architect who oversaw the project was named Deepaka. There is an inscription on a pillar near the main shrine stating that in 1439 Deepaka, an architect, constructed the temple at the direction of Dharanka, a devoted Jain. When the ground floor was completed, Acharya Soma Sundar Suri of Tapa Gachha supervised the ceremonies, which are described in Soma-Saubhagya Kavya. The construction continued until 1458AD.

The temple was renovated time to time. Some famililies supported the construction of devakulikas and mandaps. The descendants of Dharanashah now mainly live in Ghanerao. The temple has been managed by the Anandji Kalyanji Pedhi trust in the past century

Thanks to Wikipedia and its contributors

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